Meet the IPM: Interview with Prof Cathy Parker

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Cathy Parker is Professor of Marketing and Retail Enterprise at Manchester Metropolitan University as well as Chair of the Institute of Place Management and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Place Management and Development. She has worked at Manchester Metropolitan since 1997 when she joined as a Senior Research Fellow. Cathy has managed over £10m of research projects – all focused upon strengthening town and city centres, in terms of their offer and governance structures and processes. Her research interests include retail, place marketing and the impact of litter upon both brand and place attitudes. Cathy is a regular keynote speaker and media commentator talking about the changing retail landscape and how town and city centres are adapting post-Internet.  Continue reading “Meet the IPM: Interview with Prof Cathy Parker”

Power of Place: Carlisle

Carlisle Town Hall
Carlisle Town Hall

by Prof Cathy Parker*

On 11th May 2016 I was invited by Cumbria Business Interaction Centre, part of the University of Cumbria, to talk about local distinctiveness and growth for Carlisle to a small group of 10 local business owners, council officers and university staff. My evidence credentials were our ESRC-funded High Street UK 2020 project findings and new initial footfall research from the InnovateUK-funded place data science project, “Bringing Big Data to Small Users“. Continue reading “Power of Place: Carlisle”

Maintaining a vibrant Harrogate town centre

Betty's Tea Rooms Harrogate
Betty’s Tea Rooms Harrogate

by Prof Cathy Parker*

9th May 2016 I was invited to share the findings of our ESRC-funded High Street UK2020research at the 120th AGM of the Harrogate Chamber of Commerce.

Also presenting the future of transport for Harrogate was Cllr Don Mackenzie, North Yorkshire County Council and Cllr Rebecca Burnett, Harrogate Borough Council, provided an update on the Harrogate town centre strategy & masterplan.

About 130 people gave up an hour and half of their evening to hear how retail centres across the UK are changing and how Harrogate is planning to adapt. Continue reading “Maintaining a vibrant Harrogate town centre”

Can we provide more accurate predictors of footfall than catchment alone?

Bauman street, Kazan. ken by Robert Broadie on 13 November, 2005.
Bauman street, Kazan. ken by Robert Broadie on 13 November, 2005.

by Prof Cathy Parker*

Continuing on the theme of identifying research questions for our Improving the Customer Experience in Town Cenres: Bringing Big Data to Small Users project, we are wondering whether we can start to predict footfall in a particular location.

With more retail sales moving on-line and out-of-town then traditional catchment areas or numbers may need updating. In fact, in HSUK2020, Millington, Ntounis, Parker and Quin (2015) found that local resident population was a better predictor of footfall in smaller locations than catchment statistics. We like footfall as a measure as it concentrates on actual attractiveness (the number of people a retail centre actually attracts) rather than ‘potential’ attractiveness (catchment).
We will develop an improvement on existing methods of identifying catchment by providing a new method of predicting footfall (consisting, initially, of those components identified in HSUK2020, i.e., geographical location, location of nearest stronger centre, resident population, employment, tourism and vacancy rates). Continue reading “Can we provide more accurate predictors of footfall than catchment alone?”

How does weather impact upon footfall?

rainby Prof Cathy Parker*

Bad weather can impact on footfall, especially in traditional open retail centres like the High Street. During traditional peaks like Easter, bad weather can reduce footfall by around 5% according to Springboard who collect footfall data in retail centres across the UK. But good weather doesn’t impact as positively on retail footfall as consumers often find other things to do when the sun shines – like visiting the seaside, parks and other attractions. Continue reading “How does weather impact upon footfall?”

Multifunctional Centres: a sustainable role for town and city centres

1200px-Benkid77_Neston_town_centre_2_240709
By Rept0n1x – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7475787

by Dr Steve Millington, Nikos Ntounis, Prof Cathy Parker and Simon Quin

Executive summary [You can download the full report from the IPM site]

Whilst omni-channel retailing and the digital high street may be two of the latest talking points in the retail property industry, our towns and city centres have always been shape by a series of technological, social and political revolutions. The purpose of this report is to examine how, after many years of mono-functionality focused upon retailing, our centres are experiencing something of a renaissance, and remerging as multi-functional ones, supporting leisure and recreation, employment, tourism, heritage, culture, housing, employment, education, health and wellbeing, as well as retail. Continue reading “Multifunctional Centres: a sustainable role for town and city centres”

Images from the 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places

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A very interesting and impactful event

The 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places heard presentations from 36 authors, with delegates representing 28 institutions from 15 countries across Europe, the USA, the Middle East and the Far East.

You can read the reflections on the event and brief abstracts from each academic and practitioner presentation here, and thanks to our wonderful photographer Ian Southerin, you can take a look at more images in a short video that captured the atmosphere of our fantastic event.  Continue reading “Images from the 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places”

What different town types are emerging in the multi-channel era?

1200px-Shoppers_on_Dundas,_near_Yonge
By Ian Muttoo – originally posted to Flickr as Alone / TogetherUploaded using F2ComButton, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8808073

by Prof Cathy Parker*

Our ‘Bringing Big Data to Small Users‘ project is funded by Innovate UK, the UK Goverment’s innovation agency,to improve the customer experience of town centres and traditional retail areas, such as high streets and markets. The project will do this by bringing new research and insight directly to key stakeholders in locations – such as retailers and other businesses, property owners, local councils and place managers. The project is led by retail data specialists Springboard, who are the sector leaders in collecting footfall data in retail and other locations.

Continue reading “What different town types are emerging in the multi-channel era?”

What should we do to better manage and market places?

corfu3

By Dr Heather Skinner*

Find out what our keynote speakers from the 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing and Marketing Places think.

On day 1 of the Symposium, Nikolaos-Foivos Kaloudis presented some of the work undertaken by the Tourism Scientific Society of Corfu into how we can develop alternative forms of tourism in Corfu and Paxoi

Continue reading “What should we do to better manage and market places?”

Markets Matter: Reviewing the evidence & detecting the market effect

 

Berwick_street_market_1

Executive Summary

At the request of the National Association of British Market Authorities and, as part of the High Street UK2020 project, we have conducted a comprehensive review of the published evidence demonstrating, unequivocally, that markets contribute to the economic, social and political health of towns and cities. We have also conducted analyses of large footfall datasets, provided by Springboard, to show that markets add to the vitality of specific centres. Finally, we show how markets act as important catalysts for change in town and city centres. These are the 25 most important reasons why markets matter, identified in this report.

[You can download the full report from the IPM site]

Continue reading “Markets Matter: Reviewing the evidence & detecting the market effect”