Meet the IPM: Interview with Mihalis Kavaratzis

mihalis kavaratzisMihalis Kavaratzis is Associate Professor of Marketing at the School of Business, University of Leicester, UK. He holds a PhD on city marketing from the University of Groningen, Netherlands and has taught marketing and tourism related courses in the Netherlands, Hungary and the UK. His research focuses on the theory and application of place marketing, place branding and tourism destination marketing. Mihalis also acts as an adviser and delivers workshops for local authorities on Place Marketing and Place Branding. He has published extensively on those topics including the co-edited volumes ‘Towards Effective Place Brand Management’ (with G.J. Ashworth, 2010), ‘Rethinking Place Branding’ (with G. Warnaby and G.J. Ashworth, 2015) and ‘Inclusive Place Branding’ (with M. Giovanardi and M. Lichrou, 2017). Mihalis is a Senior Fellow of the Institute of Place Management. Continue reading “Meet the IPM: Interview with Mihalis Kavaratzis”

Remembering Greg Ashworth

Mihalis Kavaratzis (left) with Erik Braun (centre) and Greg Ashworth.
Mihalis Kavaratzis (left) with Erik Braun (centre) and Greg Ashworth.

by Mihalis Kavaratzis

We were meeting in a pub in Groningen over beers – that’s where we always met, over dinner and drinks, never in an office.

“When’s the big party?” he asked.

“What party?” I asked back.

“Your defence party.”

“What does that have to do with anything?”

“Book a date for your party! Book the restaurant and order food and drinks. Then you can start planning backwards and you’ll find out what you have to do tomorrow…” Continue reading “Remembering Greg Ashworth”

The experts are dead: Long live the experts.

Journal of Place Management and Development

by Dominic Medway and Cathy Parker

Journal of Place Management and Development, Issue 9.3: Editorial

On June 24th this year Dominic Medway wrote on his Twitter feed: “@PlaceManagement Places are ultimately made, unmade, defined and redefined by people before institutions. We’ve seen that today”. This was of course referring to the result of the so-called ‘Brexit’ referendum on whether the United Kingdom should leave the EU. The pollsters and the City of London seemed reasonably confident that the outcome of the vote, on June 23rd 2016, would be to ‘remain’, but it seemed both these institutional bodies hugely underestimated the power of the voters to exercise their democratic right to chart an alternative future. Continue reading “The experts are dead: Long live the experts.”